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Martha Carrillo is a lesbian women engaged in HIV work in Belize, and Latin America and the Caribbean more broadly. She was the co-founder of the first ever NGO providing support to persons living with HIV, in particular men who have sex with men. She has also served as the Director of the National AIDS Commission, and owns her own consultancy company providing technical assistance in the areas of human rights, advocacy training, and capacity building for key affected populations. She is the founder of an online support/social group for lesbians and bi women called W4W Belize (women4women) and a Counseling Psychologist by profession. OutRight interviews Martha on what lead her to become an advocate for LGBTIQ rights and her current work in the Caribbean. OutRight: What experiences first made you aware of the need to advocate for LGBTIQ rights? How did you first get involved with your earliest experiences and current...

Global LGBTIQ advocates will once again convene this December at OutRight’s annual Advocacy Week in New York City. The ten day event will have advocates amass for trainings and meetings with U.N. representatives to discuss global LGBTIQ issues. This invaluable collaboration between advocates will culminate at OutSummit, the capstone meeting where attendees are invited to discuss unique social and political issues that LGBTIQ people face in a diverse range of nations. Since 2016, Nikki Brörmann has served at COC Netherlands as the International Advocacy Officer. The scope of Brörmann’s job at COC Netherlands includes liaising with and assisting international partners as they attempt to build stability for LGBTIQ people in their respective countries. In particular, Brörmann is charged with supporting efforts of PRIDE and Bridging the Gaps II campaigns. Here is what Brörmann had to say about building her activist career and causes. Note: the following questions and responses have been edited...

*Content Warning: This post discusses violence and suicide* ‘What is it like to be an LGBTI person in your country?’ I believe that we should consider our losses, the ones that are visible in the media and known by us, and the ones that we do not know that occur in the suburbs of my country. Those being raped, or are targeted by transphobia and hate crimes in the backstreets of Tarlabasi or other cities in this country. I really do not know where to start or which part of the LGBTIQ acronym to discuss first. There is X’s story, which ends in a forced marriage to ‘correct’ her lesbianism or his gender identity. Imagine a father saying “You’ll remember being a woman after having a penis inside of you!” Or… The story of Ahmet, who was stabbed many times by his own father because of his sexual orientation. Who is the perpetrator? Let’s go...